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Tímea Tarjáni

Phone: +36 30 427 6699
Email: info@budapestjewishwalk.hu
21 Wesselényi Street (entrance from Nagydiófa Street)
Budapest, Hungary

Budapestjewishwalk in the cemetery of Salgótarjáni Street

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Budapestjewishwalk in the cemetery of Salgótarjáni Street

There is an absolute hidden gem in my neighbourhood I wish to share a few things about here, and that is the Art Nouveau Jewish cemetery in Salgótarjáni Street, in the eighth district of Budapest. Whenever I guide my guests there, I always get totally positive feedback on how much it worth visiting the place. Yes, I cannot agree more. It has an atmosphere you do not usually expect in a cemetery: infinite peacefulness meets the joy of experiencing breathtaking architecture of massive and at the same time beautifully crafted family tombs of Jewish noble families and industrialists of the time, which is about fifty years from the founding of the cemetery in 1874. Quite a few of the tombs are the work of leading architects of the era: Sándor Fellner, Ignác Alpár, Emil Vidor and Béla Lajta. Lajta, whose work prefigured art deco, also designed the entrance from the street and the huge ceremonial hall from the very beginning of the 20th century.

Nowadays overgrown and neglected on one side, amazing and unique on the other. A strange combination, though. The place is pretty deserted but it’s safe: there is decent security and a responsible young caretaker who lets you in and ties up his dogs when you enter. This cemetery is so close to the city centre and the Jewish Quarter of the seventh district, which is the most visited Jewish heritage area of Budapest, that I highly recommend adding it to any Jewish walks. It adds a so different, off-path kind of experience to a tour (usually we are the only visitors), nobody should miss.

The photographs added to this post were taken by György Jókuti.

4 Comments
  • LESLIE WORTZMAN
    Posted at 13:08h, 10 October Reply

    THANK YOU FOR A WONDERFUL VISIT TO YOUR CEMETERY. WHAT YOU ARE BOTH DOING IS SO IMPORTANT. IT WAS WONDERFUL TO MEET YOU AND WE WILL SPREAD THE WORD.

  • TIMEA TARJANI
    Posted at 16:13h, 11 October Reply

    You’re welcome Leslie. I am happy you joined me to share the experience and the atmosphere of this hidden gem. I am also thankful and highly respectful for the heroic work done there by Zsóka and Gyula.

  • Catherine Johansson
    Posted at 17:12h, 16 November Reply

    We visit the cemetery for the third time in 2 years. I agree, it is an amazing place in many ways.
    There is a new caretaker, no dogs anymore, and a kind of renovation seems to be on the way. For better or worse.

    • Tímea Tarjani
      Posted at 15:43h, 17 November Reply

      Thank you for your comment Catherine. The change you have witnessed is very recent and honestly I am not quite happy about it. I simply cannot understand why Gyula and Zsóka, the caretakers had to leave…I am also convinced that because of the changes -for better or worse, as you say- the cemetery has already lost a lot from its atmosphere and truly committed people whose entire life was to deal with it in many ways, almost as a mission.

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